The Web We Lost – Anil Dash

Posted on December 13th, 2012

We’ve lost key features that we used to rely on, and worse, we’ve abandoned core values that used to be fundamental to the web world. To the credit of today’s social networks, they’ve brought in hundreds of millions of new participants to these networks, and they’ve certainly made a small number of people rich

But they haven’t shown the web itself the respect and care it deserves, as a medium which has enabled them to succeed. And they’ve now narrowed the possibilites of the web for an entire generation of users who don’t realize how much more innovative and meaningful their experience could be.

via The Web We Lost – Anil Dash.

In defense of yes. (or at least “oh alright, I suppose so.”) – reciprocity

Posted on December 12th, 2012

It’s very much in vogue right now to espouse the benefits of “saying no” And, of course, I believe that you shouldn’t do things that make you unhappy or work with people who don’t add to or feed the work. But I also believe there is great value in sometimes doing the thing you don’t want to do, doing someone a favor, even doing something out of obligation. Because sometimes that thing we think we’re going to hate turns into the thing we actually love and every once in a while the person we wrote off, ends up being exactly the person we need.

via In defense of yes. (or at least "oh alright, I suppose so.") – reciprocity.

While I believe that saying no is saying yes to other things, I believe that there are few greater deeds than saying yes to something or someone that will truly benefit from your time and attention. In fact, saying no to lesser things should be the default in order to make way for yes to these.

Frank Chimero – Digital Jubilee

Posted on December 11th, 2012

The Jubilee offers a way out of oppressive expectations, even if they are our own. This year, I’m practicing a digital jubilee by archiving my inbox, deleting my RSS subscriptions, and unfollowing most everyone on Twitter. These, of course, will fill back up as time passes, but now I have a recurring way to purge.

via Frank Chimero – Digital Jubilee.

An office with “library rules” by Jason Fried of 37signals

Posted on December 10th, 2012

An office with "library rules" by Jason Fried of 37signals.

Everyone knows how to behave in a library. You keep quiet or whisper. You respect people’s personal space. You don’t interrupt people who are reading or working, learning or studying. And if you need to have a full-volume conversation, you hit a private room.

Such a great idea. Yet, why leave it to just those in an office? What if there was a room in our homes where Library rules were respected. Perhaps a den or living room. Sounds like a great solution for a home with at least one introvert residing within.

Saying Goodbye to Now: How Do iPhone Photos Impact Our Experience? : The New Yorker

Posted on December 5th, 2012

It’s an era of controlled deprivations and detoxification, of fasts and cleanses. Perhaps everyone should make a weekly ritual of twenty-four hours of undocumented life. Periods of time in which memory must do all the heavy lifting, or none of it, as it chooses, the consequences being what they may be. No phone, no eclipse glasses to mitigate the intensity of what lies before you. The only options are appetite, experience, memory, and later, if so inclined, writing it down

via Saying Goodbye to Now: How Do iPhone Photos Impact Our Experience? : The New Yorker.

Dopamine Makes You Addicted To Seeking Information | Weinschenk Institute, LLC

Posted on December 3rd, 2012

With the internet, twitter, and texting we now have almost instant gratification of our desire to seek. Want to talk to someone right away? Send a text and they respond in a few seconds. Want to look up some information? Just type it into google. What to see what your friends are up to? Go to twitter or facebook. We get into a dopamine induced loop… dopamine starts us seeking, then we get rewarded for the seeking which makes us seek more. It becomes harder and harder to stop looking at email, stop texting, stop checking our cell phones to see if we have a message or a new text.

via 100 Things You Should Know About People: #8 — Dopamine Makes You Addicted To Seeking Information | Weinschenk Institute, LLC.

The Shallows: What The Internet is Doing To Our Brains by Nicholas Carr :: Books :: Reviews :: Paste

Posted on December 1st, 2012

“The Luddites of the late-18th early-19th century broke into textile factories and smashed the mechanical looms not because they didn’t like machines, but because they saw that the mechanization and industrialization of the textile industry posed a catastrophic threat to their work, family, community and culture. Luddites knew good and well how, by saying ‘yes’ to the elaborate promises of growth and efficiency that accompanied mechanization, they would also be waving goodbye to an entire way of life. Their thoughtful destructiveness was an effort to guard and nurture the things they loved most.”

via The Shallows: What The Internet is Doing To Our Brains by Nicholas Carr :: Books :: Reviews :: Paste.